tree_and_leaf: Purple tinted black and white photo of moody man, caption Church Paramilitant (image from "Ultraviolet") (Church Paramilitant)
I can't believe I haven't linked to these utterly brilliant posters for Christ Church Broadway, New Haven.

I think my favourite is "Bread and Wine, Body and Blood - Change you can believe in", but I like "Tonight we're going to worship like it's 1099" - though really, in that cotta, it's more 1899, or possibly 1929... But being serious, they do a fantastic job of communicating what the parish is committed to - worshiping God, unashamedly in the Catholic tradition, and doing things well and with care and aesthetic sense, while not taking itself too seriously.
tree_and_leaf: Portrait of John Keble in profile, looking like a charming old gentleman with a sense of humour. (anglican)
Well. Tonight I sent off the corrected version of my thesis to the examiners. I feel - sort of numb, actually.

On another note, I have just come back from the Lent devotions at church; silent prayer before the Blessed Sacrament, compline and a very attenuated Benediction. Intense (and my knees are still stiff), but very good.

I find praying in front of the Sacrament powerful and helpful, but the bit of Benediction that always moves me most is right at the start, when the priest carries the Sacrament from the tabernacle to the monstrance on the altar, wrapped in the humeral veil and held close against his chest. It almost looks like the way you would carry a very small child, wrapped up against the cold, and somehow it speaks to me very powerfully of the way in which God, for our sake, empties himself of his power, becoming human, becoming even more vulnerable in the bread and wine of the sacrament, which he makes his flesh. And how that insignificant fragment of what seems to be bread is more powerful and worthy of reverence than - pretty much any thing, really.
tree_and_leaf: Alan Rickman in role of Slope, wearing rochet, scarf, swept back hair, and hostile but smug expression (slope)
[personal profile] el_staplador has just been reading Susan Howatch, and wonders how Fr Jon Darrow (psychic, intensely charismatic, intermittently wise but also very flawed, old-school Anglo-Catholic priest) would have dealt with the Rev'd Magister.

This Important Question has eaten my brain; I am, alas, no nearer answering it than I was, but I want to read (or write) this so badly I can hardly say....

Though it would undoubtedly be one of those fics that only about three people in fandom, including myself, would find at all interesting.
tree_and_leaf: Portrait of John Keble in profile, looking like a charming old gentleman with a sense of humour. (anglican)
On a happier note, today the Church of England commemorates John Keble (1792-1866), priest, fellow of Oriel College (where he and Newman more or less invented the Oxford tutorial system, revolutionising university teaching), Professor of Poetry of the University of Oxford, and one of the initiators of the Oxford Movement. Even outside Anglo-Catholic circles, though, the Anglican Communion would be very different without Keble, Newman, Pusey et al, both in essentials - it's largely down to the Tractarians that weekly communion has become normal - and in the externals (vestments and candles). The catholic revival gave new energy to the Church of England and beyond, particularly in its involvement in mission, outreach, and general social justice issues in deprived urban areas.* In later life he was friends with CM Yonge, and his influence is tangible in her novels.

I've always liked Keble - quite apart from his loyalty to the C of E, he seems to have been an attractive character. My icon shows him in age, but there's a nice pencil drawing of him as a younger man:

which is below the cut, to spare your flist )
tree_and_leaf: Portrait of John Keble in profile, looking like a charming old gentleman with a sense of humour. (anglican)
It's term again, which is good on the whole, though there is a fair bit of busyness and distractions coming up as a result.

One of the good things is morning prayer in college; actually having a fixed time which is non-negotiable is good in itself from a discipline and structuring day point of view, but I like saying the Office with other people (even if this generally means a congregation of two or three), and I like the Oratory (in an oriel window tucked behind the organ loft) as a space, despite the disastrous stained glass. And I like it at this time of year, when we open by singing the Regina Caeli (second translation), rather than saying the Angelus.

Actually, if I am being cold-blooded, I think the Angelus is a better devotion, but the singing and the use of a cheerful tune ("Jesus Christ is Risen Today") is an agreeably festive start to the day.
tree_and_leaf: Portrait of John Keble in profile, looking like a charming old gentleman with a sense of humour. (anglican)
I know, I know, I have just been moaning about how much I have to do and should not be faffing about on LJ, but I have to share my delight in the fact that today George Herbert (Priest, poet, 1633, lesser festival) is commemorated in the Anglican calendar, with a particularly fine collect. So have it, and also one of my favourite Herbert poems:


PRAYER. (I)

PRAYER the Churches banquet, Angels age,
Gods breath in man returning to his birth,
The soul in paraphrase, heart in pilgrimage,
The Christian plummet sounding heav’n and earth ;

Engine against th’ Almightie, sinner's towre,
Reversed thunder, Christ-side-piercing spear,
The six daies world-transposing in an houre,
A kinde of tune, which all things heare and fear ;

Softnesse, and peace, and joy, and love, and blisse,
Exalted Manna, gladnesse of the best,
Heaven in ordinarie, man well drest,
The milkie way, the bird of Paradise,

Church-bels beyond the stars heard, the souls bloud,
The land of spices, something understood.


King of glory, king of peace,
who called your servant George Herbert
from the pursuit of worldly honours
to be a priest in the temple of his God and king:
grant us also the grace to offer ourselves
with singleness of heart in humble obedience to your service;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever.

Amen.
tree_and_leaf: David Tennant in Edwardian suit, Oxford MA gown and mortar board. (academic doctor)
Further to the mind-bogglingly stupid interview with Russell T Davis [livejournal.com profile] snorkackcatcher kindly scanned in, and Mr Davis' truth, universally acknowledged, that two characters of a similar age and appearing on screen together, must be involved in a love story: I just want to say that my new OTP is Ten/ Unexpected Woman Priest from the end of The Family of Blood. OMGtheirloveissoAnglican.

Seriously, though, this lunatic reflection reminds me of how absurdly happy it made me that Paul Cornell wrote that tiny bit part for a woman. Not as a comic lady vicar (see: The Vicar of Dibley) or as a source of predictable, boring, issue-y drama (see: The Archers), or otherwise there to be a WOMAN! priest, but rather simply as a priest, doing her job.

It's probably the most feminist moment of season 3, in its quiet little way.
tree_and_leaf: Portrait of John Keble in profile, looking like a charming old gentleman with a sense of humour. (anglican)
I rather like the collect of the day today:

O God, the judge of all,
who gave your servant John of the Cross
a warmth of nature, a strength of purpose
and a mystical faith
that sustained him even in the darkness:
shed your light on all who love you
and grant them union of body and soul
in your Son Jesus Christ our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever.

Amen
tree_and_leaf: Isolated tree in leaf, against blue sky. (Default)
I've only just discovered that last Monday's 'In Tune' on R3 featured an interview (with music) with Stephen Rice of the Brabant Ensemble (http://www.brabantensemble.com/ ) - which will be of interest to [livejournal.com profile] sammee42 if no-one else, but I recommend it to anyone who is interested in early choral music.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/aod/mainframe.shtml?http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/aod/radio3.shtml , then scroll down to 'In Tune' and click 'Mon'.

It's only up till tomorrow, though. (The relevant section starts at about 01:15:00, just after the Cage piece). Absolutely gorgeous music - though it's a little disconcerting to hear one's local church being mentioned on national radio!
tree_and_leaf: Portrait of John Keble in profile, looking like a charming old gentleman with a sense of humour. (anglican)
From the webpage of the Church Times

About Church Times

The Church Times, founded in 1863, has become the world's leading Anglican weekly newspaper. It has always been independent of the Church of England hierarchy. It was a family concern until 1989, when ownership passed to Hymns Ancient & Modern, a Christian charitable trust. The Church Times was started to campaign for Anglo-Catholic principles, which it did with vigour and rudeness. But in the 1940s and '50s the paper began the move to broaden its outlook and coverage. It now attempts to provide balanced and fair reporting of events and opinions across the whole range of Anglican affairs. The rudeness we now leave to our readers.
tree_and_leaf: Portrait of John Keble in profile, looking like a charming old gentleman with a sense of humour. (anglican)
I can't resist pointing out that today is the festival of Julian of Norwich, mystic and writer of genius (and one of the earliest named English women authors to boot)

ETA: And all shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

Hm: if only I knew how to do animated icons; that would make a good one.
tree_and_leaf: Portrait of John Keble in profile, looking like a charming old gentleman with a sense of humour. (anglican)
I'm currently reading up on Our Lady, or rather on the Virgin in mediaeval theology and culture. It's extraordinary difficult to find good work on the subject, though: I've already moaned about the Freudian brigade, but between the sickly piety of many of the Catholic writers on the other hand, and the Catholic-bashers on the other hand, I am beginning to get a little fed up. Pity Miri Rubin's book isn't out yet, as the articles I read by her on the subject are very promising.

Insert Rant here )

In a happier and more Anglican connection, I note that today is the commemoration of George Herbert. The C of E obligingly provides a collect of the day on the subject, which I copy here because I rather admire the way the liturgist has worked in references to Herbert's poetry:

King of glory, king of peace, who called your servant George Herbert from the pursuit of worldly honours to be a priest in the temple of his God and king: grant us also the grace to offer ourselves with singleness of heart in humble obedience to your service; through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, who is alive and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Also, I got out of Blackwells without buying An Anglo-Catholic Manual of Devotion, which is probably good for my general sanity.
tree_and_leaf: Portrait of John Keble in profile, looking like a charming old gentleman with a sense of humour. (anglican)
As we all know, today is a lesser but nevertheless interesting festival of the Christian year.

So: Happy Feast of S.S. Cyril and Methodius, apostles of the Slavs, champions of Slavonic as a suitable language for divine worship, and devisors of Cyrillic.

A very Catholic perspective: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04592a.htm

An Orthodox account: http://orthodoxwiki.org/Cyril_and_Methodius
tree_and_leaf: Isolated tree in leaf, against blue sky. (Default)
I went down to the religious bookshop (St Phillips, new, second hand and rare) on St Aldates today, looking for a translation of Gertrud the Great - which, indeed, I found.

I also found, while resisting the urge to buy Charles William's extraordinarily partial but none the less interesting history of mysticism, the 'first cheap edition 352 pages 4/6' of Four Sacred Plays by Dorothy L Sayers. I couldn't resist, though I think I've just sabotaged my chance of getting amything done this afternoon.

The bookshop itself is extremely well stocked, though obviously by a Catholic - the English Missal and reports from the Anglo-Catholic conferences of the thirties were filed austerely under 'Anglican and Non-Conformist', which is accurate as far as it goes, but still somehow amusing...

But, anyway, 352 pages of new Sayers!
tree_and_leaf: Isolated tree in leaf, against blue sky. (Default)
Today is the feast (well, actually it's a Lesser Festival, but let's not be pedantic) of S. Margaret of Scotland; and also the commemoration of Edmund Rich , in whose name was founded Teddy Hall, otherwise St Edmund Hall in Oxford.
tree_and_leaf: Isolated tree in leaf, against blue sky. (Default)
This recommendation comes a little late, but for all those out there interested in (church) music, the social history of the last century, or how - despite the best efforts of the then Archbishop of Canterbury - a key part of the musical traditions of this country were formed, I point you in the direction of Iain Bradley discussing The English Hymnal on the BBC:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/aod/mainframe.shtml?http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/aod/radio4_aod.shtml?radio4/englishhymnal

Link should be active until noon Tuesday, GMT.

Profile

tree_and_leaf: Isolated tree in leaf, against blue sky. (Default)
tree_and_leaf

May 2017

S M T W T F S
 123456
7 8910111213
1415161718 1920
21222324252627
28293031   

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios