Another insta-rec

Aug. 23rd, 2017 01:42 pm
cesy: "Cesy" - An old-fashioned quill and ink (Default)
[personal profile] cesy
http://www.attitudeiseverything.org.uk/resources/practical-guides/access-information/ has a good summary of what a venue needs to do to be accessible to a basic range of disability needs. Places like Nine Worlds and lists like Euan's Guide go a lot further, particularly for neurodiversity and complex needs, but this is a great start and easy to understand for those who are new to the subject.
legionseagle: (Default)
[personal profile] legionseagle
I'm in general pretty sceptical about the Honours system, but over recent days I've become a believer. The Honours system justifies itself by continuing not to give a knighthood to Geoffrey Boycott and by very properly giving them instead to the likes of Viv Richards, Curtly Ambrose, Wes Hall and Gary Sobers (and why the hell has Clive Lloyd not appeared on that list?), something that has recently prompted the mouthy Yorkshire rhubarb obsessive to observe that the honour was handed out "like confetti" to Windies players and that "Mine’s been turned down twice. I’d better black me face.”

Honestly, it's like a variation on Lewis's law*: Boycs' explanation for why he hasn't been knighted shows why he mustn't be knighted.

However, speaking of white knights, a whole bunch of Boycott supporters have crawled out of the woodwork on twitter, claiming that the only reason their hero hasn't had the respect he deserves is because of that pesky domestic violence conviction from 1998, and after all, that was in France so it barely counts and anyway, she was probably lying.

And since most of them are talking about "new evidence" I thought it was my public duty to do a little gentle fact checking, as a resource for others who may have to deal with these pests.

Read more... )

Anyway, as [personal profile] kalypso and I have known since the early 80s, the block to his knighthood lies not in his domestic violence conviction, his racism, his ban from Test cricket as a result of touring apartheid-era South Africa, his running out of Randall or his all-round painful personality. It lies in the deep dark reason everyone in the know knows, but no-one can talk about.


*"The comments below any article on feminism justify feminism".

The Blood is the Life for 23-08-2017

Aug. 23rd, 2017 11:00 am
miss_s_b: (Default)
[personal profile] miss_s_b

Wednesday is looking autumnal again

Aug. 23rd, 2017 10:00 am
oursin: Photograph of small impressionistic metal figurine seated reading a book (Reader)
[personal profile] oursin

What I read

Finished The Private Patient, which was readable enough, I suppose, but felt not exactly as if PDJ was phoning it in, just proceeding along well-worn ruts. Found it hard to believe in the characters. Also, while PDJ does have a sense that there is Modern Life, and makes a nod to it in Miskin, she still feels in a bit of a time-warp (unlike Rendell/Vine)

Read Ginger Frost's Illegitimacy in English Law and Society, 1860-1930 (2016), which was a freebie for reading a book proposal and I have been trying to get to for months, because Frost's work is always good and going into areas very under-explored. This one looks at illegitimacy from the angle of the illegitimate children (rather than the fallen mother) and is densely researched. Also more than a little depressing - illegitimate children had a very high mortality rate, if they weren't the victims of infanticide by desperate mothers they were subject to neglect or the general problems of poverty. Also the cruelty of the laws took so very long to change. But Frost does get the ambivalances: courts and local officials being sympathetic to the plight of unwed mothers and thus giving merciful judgments in infanticide cases, giving mothers out-relief rather than obliging them to go into the workhouse, demonstrating a certain flexibility; while thinking actually changing the rules would lead to the downfall of morality.

Also finished one of two books I have for a joint review, which also deal with a rather depressing topic.

On the go

Tanith Lee, Nightshades: Thirteen Journeys into Shadow (1993, and collecting some much earlier material). Some of these have been in other collections of hers I've read recently. Very good, if creepy.

Also, have started second book for the joint review.

Up next

If it ever arrives, the new Barbara Hambly Benjamin January mystery.

(no subject)

Aug. 23rd, 2017 09:20 am
oursin: Brush the Wandering Hedgehog by the fire (Default)
[personal profile] oursin
Happy birthday, [personal profile] natlyn!
artsyhonker: a girl with glasses and purple shoulder-length hair (Default)
[personal profile] artsyhonker
Things I want to track about music:

Title/First line of text
Composer: Last name, first name, initials, birth year, death year, nationality, website, e-mail, role, link to contact composer, link to composer's website, notes
Arranger: all the info from Composer.
Language
Lyricist
Translator
Date of composition/publication
Publisher (if applicable)
Voicing
Instrumentation
Genre (e.g. hymn, chant, anthem, canticle, responses, voluntary...)
Metre (for hymns)
Tune name (for hymns)
Duration (in time)
Duration (in verses, for hymns)
Difficulty
Hymnals the work is published in
Anthologies the work is published in
Url to order a deadtree copy
url to buy a download
url to a free download, if any legal
url to contact composer
Liturgical context: seasons, saints, services, themes, where in the service it might fit,
Scriptural references (this is fairly complicated because a piece might be relevant to one verse or to a range of them and it might skip some within that range, but at least someone has numbered the chapters and verses already, thank you Dominicans; I almost want to do this with a link to bible.oremus.org because that is a sensible site)
Lectionary Date (there are three years worth of these)
Related works (e.g. a Magnificat may be linked to a Nunc Dimittis)

Some of these are one-to-one relationships, some of them are one-to-many. I don't really get how to do the one-to-many thing, yet.

I think I need the following tables:
Works
People
Hymnals
Urls
Liturgical context
Scriptural context
Lectionary Date
Relationships between works

But, I am not quite sure what I am doing...

A bad thing and a good thing

Aug. 22nd, 2017 11:53 pm
aris_tgd: Guildenstern, "So much for scientific inquiry," watching feather fall (Guildenstern scientific inquiry)
[personal profile] aris_tgd
So I was over at a friend's this weekend for the eclipse, and my friend has a toddler, which meant watching movies that the toddler likes. Which meant sitting through Hotel Transylvania, which is not a good movie.

Honestly, no, no spoilers, because it was just bad in the most boring of ways. The conceit of "What if we put ~wacky~ stereotypical personalities on classic movie monsters" is not original nor in and of itself funny. The girl object was too good for the boy. Also, it was a movie about a girl coming of age which was entirely about her (possessive) dad and her (new cool laid-back) boyfriend, good times? (No, not good times.) It was screechingly heteronormative in the worst ways and way too into toilet humor and only one of the setpieces was at all entertaining (undercut by the emotional throughline making no damn sense.)

And I just kept thinking, what a waste, y'all! Because it would have been a thousand times better if the girl had been the POV character, if it had been about her. (Oh, and of course the secret present left by her mother was a short little hymn to One True Heterosexual Love. Of course. It wasn't even a GOOD secret. I thought of three that would have been better in the ten seconds it took to read it.)

So yeah. I overempathize with characters in fiction and I really get annoyed doing it when I don't like any aspect of said fiction. Adorable vampire girl in movie that makes no sense, you deserved better.

... Speaking of overempathizing with characters, I read C. E. Murphy's Pride and Prejudice pastiche Magic and Manners today. (I read it in a day. It was engaging.) Magic and Manners doesn't do everything right, but I literally teared up several times while reading it out of feels, so it's either good romance or hormones or both. (Or possibly stress relief from feeling like I'm making progress on things at work? Maybe all three?) There's queerness, there's multiculturalism, there's magic, there's nearly telekinetic castration, it's good times. Recommended.

Good News

Aug. 23rd, 2017 12:51 am
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Good news includes all the things which make us happy or otherwise feel good. It can be personal or public. We never know when something wonderful will happen, and when it does, most people want to share it with someone. It's disappointing when nobody is there to appreciate it. Happily, blogging allows us to share our joys and pat each other on the back.

What good news have you had recently? Are you anticipating any more?

New Verses

Aug. 22nd, 2017 10:52 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Based on an audience poll, there are new verses in the three open epics.  "The Inner Transition" has 14 new verses.  Valor's Widow shows Stylet where to stash his berettaflies.  "The Higher a Monkey Climbs" has 11 new verses.  Jules discovers that Pips is fascinated by Officer Tull.  "Two Foxes" has 11 new verses.  Kenzie is impressed by Ron's caregiving skills, but still feels uncomfortable with the helplessness caused by his injuries.

t-shirt crossover (not for me)

Aug. 22nd, 2017 07:33 pm
twistedchick: General Leia in The Force Awakens (Default)
[personal profile] twistedchick
I was looking at a catalog today and found the most frightening t-shirt I've seen in a while.

The design was meant to be patriotic and comforting -- a kitten looking out from under a draped American flag. I can't fault the idea, though it's not to my taste.

However-- on a shirt? The kitten is all head and it's huge -- the size of a small leopard. And with the shading, it appears to be emerging from the wearer's chest, confidently searching for more food...

Facebook Kittens/Alien.

Not for the win. ewwww.

Poem: "If It Doesn't Work ..."

Aug. 22nd, 2017 05:06 pm
ysabetwordsmith: (Schrodinger's Heroes)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This poem came out of the August 15, 2017 Poetry Fishbowl and is presented here as the free epic for the fishbowl reaching its $200 goal. It was inspired by prompts from [personal profile] siliconshaman and [personal profile] we_are_spc (Fallon/Isaiah). It also fills the "enemies become friends" square in my 7-31-17 card for the Cottoncandy Bingo fest and the "AU: Crossover/Fusion" square in my 4-3-17 card for the [community profile] origfic_bingo fest. This poem belongs to the Schrodinger's Heroes project.

WARNING: This poem contains some controversial topics. Highlight to read the warnings, some of which are spoilers. In this poem, alter!Alex is Harley Quinn, a conflation which may bother some readers. It also features dimensional travel, impaired consent and mental functionality, forceful interventions to address an abusive relationship, vehement objections to well-meaning help, attempted assault, use of a previous name for constructive but nonconsensual purposes, allergies, reference to vigilante activity, reference to Quinn's past abusive relationship, communication failures, confusion, mixed signals, awkward family dynamics, and other challenges. If these are sensitive issues for you, please consider your tastes and headspace before reading onward.

Read more... )

Amsterdam – Canal Barge & Rijks

Aug. 22nd, 2017 10:36 pm
nanila: wrong side of the mirror (me: wrong side of the mirror)
[personal profile] nanila
On the previously mentioned trip to Amsterdam, the bloke and I stayed on a canal barge in the Westerdok.

This was the much bigger cousin of the holiday barges that pootle up and down our Worcestershire canal. The main bulk of the hull served as the home of the bloke who ran the B&B. We were in the wheelhouse, overlooking the canal. The docks seem to serve as pretty much permanent moorings for the barges in this area. Each one had a small garden, and there was even a floating children’s play area.

It was surprisingly quiet given that the location is a mere 15 minute walk from Centraal Station. We could hear a distant roar of traffic, but mostly we heard the hangry cheeping of two adolescent coots and the occasional quack of a duck. We also found a great crested grebe nesting a few boats down. It was definitely brooding, as we never saw the nest unoccupied.

Urban great crested grebe nest
The nest itself was a rather wonderful construction, being a mix of urban rubbish and plant detritus, with a few hollyhocks artfully arranged around the edges. The grebe had two female mallard bodyguards, who immediately came to circle the nest at a careful distance, giving me the side-eye when I hopped down on to the dock from the pavement to take photos.

The barge proprietor tiptoed in every morning to leave us breakfast on the table next to the wheelhouse. It included a bottle of freshly squeezed orange juice, muesli, yoghurt, and hardboiled eggs nested in knitted cosies. Much as I wanted to sleep in, the prospect of getting that into my belly when I heard his footsteps got me out of bed pretty early both mornings. We received so much food at breakfast that we were able to make sandwiches from the bread and cheese to squirrel away for later. We ate these in the Vondelpark on the first day, and for supper on the second after the lunch at Rijks.

Apart from the sheer pleasure of walking around Amsterdam, we also indulged in a trip to a Michelin-starred restaurant for a very belated birthday treat for me. We spent three and a half hours eating lunch at Rijks, which is next to the Rijksmuseum. The bloke had mentioned that it was my birthday when he made the booking. As a result, in addition to our pudding, I got a white chocolate candle with sorbet and a little message inside. We sampled both white and red wines, all by Dutch winemakers “from everywhere in the world” (e.g. New Zealand and South Africa).

Photos from Rijks behind the cut.

+++ )

Tuesday Yardening

Aug. 22nd, 2017 04:20 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Today is mild, sunny, and breezy.  We got some rain last night, so I went out to pull field weeds from alongside the patio and strip garden. 

I've been seeing lots of butterflies today.  There was a monarch around the barrel garden and various small butterflies when I was weeding.

EDIT 8/22/17: I went back out and pulled more weeds farther along the patio edge and by the birdgift apple tree.

BBC Pidgin service don start today

Aug. 22nd, 2017 01:52 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This is so exciting!  BBC has introduced a new pidgin service to make news more accessible to African viewers.  Click any of the article thumbnails to see an example. 

Because of my linguistic coprocessor, it's very easy for me to hack a pidgin if I know any of its main antecedents.  So for instance, I can clock "don" as the past-tense marker: "BBC Pidgin don start today" = "BBC Pidgin started today."  Take a look at the new materials and see what bits of grammar and vocabulary you can identify.  \o/

Meanwhile over in Terramagne, I bet their BBC offers a whole bunch of different overlays like this.  France probably does too, because they spawned a lot of colonial languages, including the Haitian French that Saraphina speaks.  Hmm, I wonder how long it'll take Aidan to catch onto that resource, because he's not much of a TV junkie.  But an hour of French-national Haitian French overlay would be good practice for them, and a nice change from the much scarcer pure Haitian programming.


Fig and Ibid

Aug. 22nd, 2017 02:40 pm
james_davis_nicoll: (Default)
[personal profile] james_davis_nicoll
Are surrounded by cats used to other cats and thus not necessarily alarmed to see new ones. Ibid is content to sniff noses with the bolder of his new housemates, whereas I think Fig is affronted by their lack of timidity.

I still have not seen the orange kitten I was warned could be an issue. It's afraid of people but likes to tussle with older cats. I expect Ibid will like this and Fig will not.

Reading: Caprice and Rondo

Aug. 22nd, 2017 06:44 pm
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[personal profile] white_hart
I spent my weekend staving off depression by immersing myself Caprice and Rondo, the seventh of Dorothy Dunnett's eight House of Niccolò novels, and only took until today to finish it because Scales of Gold scared me off sitting up late to finish Dorothy Dunnett novels and I forced myself to put it down at 81% complete on Sunday and 90% yesterday. I'm not completely sure that Dunnett-immersion is really a good long-term antidepressant, but in the short term it seems to have worked and I am feeling a bit better now anyway.

This volume takes Nicholas from Poland to Persia, via the Crimea, and then finally back to Bruges via a sojourn in Russia which echoes The Ringed Castle. Cut off from his friends and colleagues by the revelations that ended To Lie With Lions, he originally seems bent on self-destruction, but the events of this book build on his experiences in the desert and Iceland until, by the end, it truly feels as though he has grown up and is ready to begin building a life with roots, rather than seeing everything as a game to be played and won. The plot is typically twisty and compelling, the characters flawed and human and so very real, and I think I'm finally starting to understand why some people prefer the Niccolò books to the Lymond Chronicles. (I may even end up that way myself, although I might also just start re-reading Lymond and fall for him all over again.)

Caprice and Rondo resolves enough of the series' many subplots that I had a definite feel of approaching the end of the series; although it leaves some major plot threads unresolved, it felt as if enough had been tied up that the series could almost have ended there, and I do wonder if that was deliberate - Dunnett was 74 when it was published, and although she did manage to complete Gemini and publish it the year before she died, if this had been the last book it wouldn't have been an entirely unsatisfactory ending in the way ending with any of the previous three books would have.

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